What Are The Differences Between SSDI And SSI?

Supplemental Security Income, commonly referred to as SSI, and Social Security Disability Insurance, known as SSDI or SSD, are the two most common forms of Social Security Disability benefits offered by the federal government. Both provide cash benefits and medical benefits. While it is easy to confuse SSDI and SSI, there are important similarities and differences between the two.

Both SSI and SSDI are handled through the Social Security Administration, a large administrative body with local offices throughout the country. Both use the same disability criteria for determining whether a person qualifies for benefits. And, unfortunately, the bureaucratic roadblocks to success in obtaining SSDI and SSI are similar.

SSDI and SSI differ in a few fundamental ways. SSDI is meant for workers who have paid into Social Security, and it has no income restrictions; SSDI provides medical benefits through Medicare. SSI has income limits and does not require an applicant to have worked at all; SSI recipients receive Medicaid coverage.

Helping You Get The Benefits You Need

At the St. Louis, Missouri, law firm of Alan E. DeWoskin, P.C., our lawyer helps people whose lives have been altered by a disabling medical condition. If you are unable to work because of a disability, we can help you obtain the Social Security Disability benefits to which you are entitled, whether that takes the form of SSDI, SSI or both.

If your claim was denied, you have the right to appeal. Regardless of your circumstances, we will be happy to talk to you, assess your situation and help you figure out what's best for you and your family. At Alan E. DeWoskin, P.C., you will have the opportunity to talk to a local attorney, not a paralegal or a clerk.

St. Louis And Edwardsville Supplemental Security Income Attorney | Free Disability Consultation

Our firm's St. Louis SSDI and SSI attorney can advise you regarding benefits for yourself or a loved one. Contact us for a free consultation about your Social Security Disability matter.