When a Missouri parent is injured and needs Social Security disability benefits, one common concern is what will happen with their children and if the children can also receive benefits. The Social Security Administration will pay not just to help those who receive qualifying SSD benefits for injury, but for their families as well. This is done so the children can have what they need to function on an everyday basis and complete school. Knowing who is eligible and how to get these benefits is imperative.

The following are the criteria for an unmarried child to get benefits: the child must be younger than 18; he or she can be 18 to 19 and a full-time student through 12th grade; the child is 18 or older and has a disability of his or her own that started before turning 22. In some instances, the SSA will pay for stepchildren, grandchildren, step-grandchildren, or adopted children. For the child to receive benefits, he or she must have a parent who is disabled or retired and can get Social Security; or the parent must have died after working long enough and paid Social Security taxes.

The benefits will cease at age 18 unless the child is a student or is disabled. The SSA will send a notice to the parents three months prior to the child turning 18. A full-time student will not have the benefits stopped. If the child is under age 19 and is still attending elementary or secondary school, the SSA must be informed. A school official must complete a statement saying that the child attends the school. The benefits will continue though the time the child graduates or until two months after turning 19, whichever happens first. Children who are disabled will continue getting benefits until age 22 if they were childhood disability benefits.

People who are disabled and have children should know that the children can also get disability benefits. This is vital to families who have a disabled parent or parents and need assistance to care for their children. A legal professional experienced in all areas of Social Security disability can help parents who are concerned about meeting benefits’ requirements for children to also receive SSD.

Source: ssa.gov, “Benefits for Children,” accessed on Dec. 19, 2017